White Japanese Akita
  • timkimtimkim
    Posts: 359
    This one is My favorite White akita male.
    there was white akita meiyosho more than 20 years ago and this one has potiental to become one.
    White Akita is hardest color out of all. wish I can see this male in person and also have one in U.S.A. Kaiju kennel's Mosura also is very good quality white and I'm expecting good quality white male from her later. ^^
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  • PoeticDragonPoeticDragon
    Posts: 2265
    Wish I could have seen him in person when I visited!
    「怪獣荘秋田犬」Kaiju Kennels Japanese Akita, Claire Matthews
    http://www.facebook.com/PoeticDragoness
    http://www.facebook.com/KaijuKennels
    http://www.kaijukennels.com
  • aykayk
    Posts: 1790
    What makes white the hardest color?

    Is he straighter in the rear than most JAs?
    Post edited by ayk at 2012-05-09 20:02:28
  • timkimtimkim
    Posts: 359
    Hardest in akiho show. because it's always red-brindle-white is the last.
    White color coat shows all fault or weakpoint easier than other color. also hard to keep them clean and pure white.
    Red and brindle sometimes can hide their weakness or fault with colors. Must be more reason but that is I heard from some breeders. and this male has one of the best structure for sure and they supposed to have straight rear like this one.
  • jellyfishjellyfish
    Posts: 1080
    now i want a white dog.
  • jellyfishjellyfish
    Posts: 1080
    is there a logical reason for the standard to require a straight rear?
  • renefrenef
    Posts: 36
    nice dog..
  • BradA1878BradA1878
    Posts: 12014
    He's cute!
  • lindsaytlindsayt
    Posts: 3165
    His head is really nice! I think he is a very handsome JA. Also as they age, the white coat starts to yellow and the grey under coat peeks thru.

    The rear is very straight however. This is one of things about "preservation" that always gets me (preserving a defect).
    photo c5d87957-61b6-48af-a440-4187cbfc861b_zps88ccdf88.jpg
  • aykayk
    Posts: 1790
    None of my white dogs have a grey undercoat. I can't say that I can remember any white Jindos with a grey undercoat either. The undercoat has always been white as far as I can remember.

    Methinks the dog should be run around in the mountains to evaluate how structurally sound he is. He wouldn't be an efficient trotter on level ground according to mainstream conformation theory, but on a mountain terrain, I would like to see if straighter angulation gives an up-and-down bounce that helps a dog climb or not.
  • PoeticDragonPoeticDragon
    Posts: 2265
    My white Akita has no grey undercoat. She doesn't have any grey or red on her anywhere. Even around her muzzle and lips is snow white, although the skin underneath is quite dark. The edges and backs of her ears are also white (I've seen quite a few with reddish ears). Her whiskers are white, although I did find one single jet black guard hair on the back of her neck once. It was almost 5 inches long.
    「怪獣荘秋田犬」Kaiju Kennels Japanese Akita, Claire Matthews
    http://www.facebook.com/PoeticDragoness
    http://www.facebook.com/KaijuKennels
    http://www.kaijukennels.com
  • lindsaytlindsayt
    Posts: 3165
    Granted it hasn't been more than 10ish dogs I'm thinking of, but most of the old white Akitas I've seen have had dark grey undercoat as they aged, and some yellowing. Same with the white and red Shibas (the seniors) also.
    photo c5d87957-61b6-48af-a440-4187cbfc861b_zps88ccdf88.jpg
    Post edited by lindsayt at 2012-05-10 12:36:47
  • lwrothlwroth
    Posts: 129
    I'd think allowing or encouraging such straight rears would lead to more of the defective, hyperextended hocks that I see more in JAs than AAs. It's abnormal use of a joint with each step in such dogs; maybe they don't show pain--some do, some don't--but it can't be a good thing.
  • shibamistressshibamistress
    Posts: 3453
    All my dogs have a gray undercoat in white places (the Shiba, and my Akita who is called "fawn" which in his case is a greyish white with some very very pale champagne/cream colored places). Granted, none of those are the same as an actual "cream" or white colored dog, so it's probably different.

    Anyway, he's a very handsome dog!
    Lisa, Toby (Shiba), Oskar and Zora (American Akita), and Leo (Kai Ken)
  • PoeticDragonPoeticDragon
    Posts: 2265
    @shibamistress I took a closer look at my other dogs now that you mentioned it.

    Gojira (red with urajiro) has a pale grey undercoat in all areas made white by urajiro - her face, chest, legs, and underside of her tail. She has dark charcoal grey undercoat where her fur is red. She is pure white in the areas where her irish spotting is, including a spot on her neck, tail, and her muzzle.

    Ghidora (brindle) has dark grey undercoat everywhere the brindle pattern is. His black stripes are pretty dense, so even the area which would have urajiro on his face and cheeks has dark undercoat. However, the white on his snout, front of his chest, tail, and socks caused by irish spotting are pure white.

    Of course, most of the places I listed as being white have little or no undercoat on both dogs cause they're at the extremities.
    「怪獣荘秋田犬」Kaiju Kennels Japanese Akita, Claire Matthews
    http://www.facebook.com/PoeticDragoness
    http://www.facebook.com/KaijuKennels
    http://www.kaijukennels.com
    Post edited by PoeticDragon at 2012-05-11 12:22:54
  • jellyfishjellyfish
    Posts: 1080
    Toki has, on average, a medium grey undercoat. In the reds, he is light grey.

    Zuma (toki's sister), on the other hand, as a white undercoat (or at least, really really light grey). I only remember noticing this on her hackles and back.

    Thought that was neat :)
    Post edited by jellyfish at 2012-05-11 10:53:14
  • *JackBurton**JackBurton*
    Posts: 1250
    "I'd think allowing or encouraging such straight rears would lead to more of the defective, hyperextended hocks that I see more in JAs than AAs. It's abnormal use of a joint with each step in such dogs; maybe they don't show pain--some do, some don't--but it can't be a good thing."

    Linda could you rephrase this? Maybe I am having trouble grasping this.
    www.akita-inu.com
    www.Japanese-Akitas.com
    pedigrees.akita-inu.com
  • timkimtimkim
    Posts: 359
    I meant straight leg like this one. not real straight let like "I".
    This is another photo of this dog. may be the picture on top didn't show it correctly but here you go again.
    Photobucket
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    I think this dog have perfect balance for AKITA. but Like I mention, I probably didn't explain it correctly.
  • PoeticDragonPoeticDragon
    Posts: 2265
    (This post was in the wrong thread)
    「怪獣荘秋田犬」Kaiju Kennels Japanese Akita, Claire Matthews
    http://www.facebook.com/PoeticDragoness
    http://www.facebook.com/KaijuKennels
    http://www.kaijukennels.com
    Post edited by PoeticDragon at 2012-05-11 15:48:30
  • aykayk
    Posts: 1790
    He looks much better in the newer set of pictures. More visible bend in the stifle joint and the hock joint.

    It looks like he's much younger in the new pics, though?
    Post edited by ayk at 2012-05-11 15:21:09
  • aykayk
    Posts: 1790
    I think this photo demonstrates what Linda is referring to: (rear leg in foreground)

    image

    The dog extends the leg, and while weight is on the leg, the hock joint can be pushed forward. Some people imagine it as similar to a human being double-jointed. Most others will refer to it as "slipped hocks" or "popping hocks".

    Some people don't consider it a working fault, others do. In the Pat Hasting seminar that I attended, we saw a Alaskan Klee Kai that had the absolute worst hocks. You could actually see the hocks go out while the dog was moving. Most dogs with slipped hocks don't get it as bad.

    In my itty bitty Akita circle, I've known one AA and one JA to have them. The AA had a tendency to self-stack with chest out, leaning forward while stretching out his back legs. I don't see show AA take this position as much, but I do see Japanese dogs stacked in this way. It accentuates the straightness of the back legs quite a bit. I don't think all dogs are that straight in their normal positions though.

    Post edited by ayk at 2012-05-11 16:14:35
  • PoeticDragonPoeticDragon
    Posts: 2265
    Popping hocks should definitely be a fault! I don't think any of the photos of this white dog look as bad as @ayk's example, and I think in most of them the angle of the shot makes it hard to tell, regardless. Only in @timkim's latest post do you see a full side view.
    「怪獣荘秋田犬」Kaiju Kennels Japanese Akita, Claire Matthews
    http://www.facebook.com/PoeticDragoness
    http://www.facebook.com/KaijuKennels
    http://www.kaijukennels.com
    Post edited by PoeticDragon at 2012-05-11 15:52:28
  • timkimtimkim
    Posts: 359
    First picture was more recent but one of my friend went to japan and took picture in free standing.

    other picture was at the show.

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