Long-haired Akitas
  • So I have a question for people: what's up with the long-haired Akitas? I know it is a fault for show (well, ok, I only looked up the Japanese standards, but I think it is for the AA's too). So why would breeders be purposefully breeding them, or is it just one of those things some breeders do but shouldn't do (like breeding for colors that aren't standard in other breeds, etc)?

    Then I saw something that claimed the long-haired Akitas were less dog aggressive so that was why some people were introducing them into their breeding programs, but could that be true? Sounds odd to me.

    I figure sometimes the long-haired ones might show up unintentionally, as a cream-colored Shiba may show up in litters (I don't know enough about genetics and breeding to know why that happens, though I know it does), but there isn't a reason to breed for it, is there?

    How common are they?

    anyway, I've come across them a couple of times now, mostly with breeders selling them for a lower price (no doubt because it is a fault), but was curious to hear what people knew about them, esp. if anyone knows if there is a history to them.....
    Lisa, Toby (Shiba), Oskar and Zora (American Akita), and Leo (Kai Ken)
  • *JackBurton**JackBurton*
    Posts: 1369
    Both Akita need to carry the long-coat gene to be able to produce a long coat. I do not know of anyone who is trying to breed them on purpose. My guess is that one of the two Akita involved have not been screened that is why moku(I think that is the term) show up.
    www.akita-inu.com
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    pedigrees.akita-inu.com
    Post edited by Unknown User at -0001-11-30 00:00:00
  • sukoshi_momsukoshi_mom
    Posts: 775
    See the pictures of the long-haired Shibas on the Kawakami thread. These show up occasionally too.
    Post edited by Unknown User at -0001-11-30 00:00:00
  • Thanks, this is what I was wondering....esp. if anyone was trying to breed them on purpose. I'm also wondering if a breeder has them regularly, does that suggest they are not breeding carefully?
    Lisa, Toby (Shiba), Oskar and Zora (American Akita), and Leo (Kai Ken)
    Post edited by Unknown User at -0001-11-30 00:00:00
  • akitariseakitarise
    Posts: 180


    JA


    Havent heard about anyone deliberately trying to breed them tho. Just happens from time to time from what i heard.
    Post edited by akitarise at 2010-03-12 19:28:35
  • white_bearwhite_bear
    Posts: 295
    If both akita carry the recessive gene that gives longcoat there will be affected puppies in the litter. It's classic genetics, 2 carriers having 4 puppies = 1 clear, 1 affected (longcoat) and 2 carriers.

    IMHO all that about better temperament is just a load of crap, how could doubling up on longcoat generate better temperament? I think it's just a matter of association, longcoat akitas are cutee and people tend to cuddle them more, thus they are better socialized and people draw the conclusion they have better temperament.

    A couple of years ago when I first studied this matter in detail I found some AA breeders in the US that were breeding longcoat akitas and were really proud about it. I can't remember who they are, I must check my archives.

    To my mind they are exactly like the rest, they are amazing dogs and deserve the best families an akita could have. But I don't think they should be allowed in the ring. The fluffy bear appearence is just not true to type. In Europe longcoat puppies are sold as pets at half the price of a show puppy. Prior to the breeding careful research is being done to see if that bitch or sire has given birth to long-coated puppies and if that is the case the breeder puts into balance the quality of the dog versus the possibility of giving birth to long-coated puppies - this is not desired, although it happens (in some kennels more than others). It's not common to test the dogs for longcoat. I'm still looking for a lab close enough to do the test.

    Oh, I forgot to add that sometimes when the puppy changes its hair the longcoat can be replaced by normal coat. My Angel was born in a litter with longcoat, that's why he's so furry. In general, whites have the worst fur, but his resembles the fur of a brindled akita. He was even furrier when he was a pup, but the longer hairs were replaced by shorter ones.
    Irina and the kids: Tenshi, Hinu, Tsuki, Kito, Dori, Mizuki (JA) and feline beast Loulou.
    http://akita-ken.ro/
    Post edited by Unknown User at -0001-11-30 00:00:00
  • IMHO FAULT SHMALT they are cute as hell.
    Fuzzy Gang Signature
    Post edited by Unknown User at -0001-11-30 00:00:00
  • MnVMnV
    Posts: 196
    ZOMG, a Teddy Bear!
    Post edited by Unknown User at -0001-11-30 00:00:00
  • aykayk
    Posts: 1979
    Here's a page that explains long-hair appearance with pictures. It's for Malamutes, but the same info applies for Akitas.


    http://kwestmals.com/malcolorgeneticsCoatLength.html
    Post edited by Unknown User at -0001-11-30 00:00:00
  • IMHO all that about better temperament is just a load of crap, how could doubling up on longcoat generate better temperament? I think it's just a matter of association, longcoat akitas are cutee and people tend to cuddle them more, thus they are better socialized and people draw the conclusion they have better temperament.

    What you say could be entirely true, and I know nothing about JA, but it is not out of the realm of genetic possibility that some traits are carried with other genetic characteristics. This happens in breeds all the time, even in those where both varieties are born in the same litter. I've talked to long-time Collie breeders who will tell you that the Smooth Collie is a different animal: more prey-driven, more active, more rambunctious than his more laid-back Lassie-type brother.
    Post edited by Unknown User at -0001-11-30 00:00:00
  • HeidiHeidi
    Posts: 3379
    If two genes are located close to each other on an allele, they're more likely to be handed down together. Think in humans how blonde hair usually goes with blue eyes. Although, there are plenty of brown-eyed blondes and blue-eyed brunettes.

    So, long coats might have a correlation with better temperaments, but if all evidence is anecdotal, it may very well be fabricated.
    Rakka 落下(Shikoku Ken), Sosuke 宗介 (Kai Ken), Hester, Stephanie, and Batgirl(cats)
    image
    Post edited by Unknown User at -0001-11-30 00:00:00
  • They make giant Tanukis? Sweet!
    Post edited by Unknown User at -0001-11-30 00:00:00
  • SangmortSangmort
    Posts: 5510
    They do look like bigger Tanuki's LOL ~
    Post edited by Unknown User at -0001-11-30 00:00:00
  • Interesting to hear how about how it happens--the long coat I mean.

    I have to admit they are not the dog for me....they kind of remind me of a chow-akita cross....
    Lisa, Toby (Shiba), Oskar and Zora (American Akita), and Leo (Kai Ken)
    Post edited by Unknown User at -0001-11-30 00:00:00
  • In one of those photos in the first video, that dog ACTUALLY could be confused with a Grizzly Bear at first glance [0:34]!
    www.airreyalis.com | Shikoku Ken image

    Shoushuu | Kotomi | Shuran | Ayla | Kukku | Maika | Asra

    Other Members of The Airreyalis Pack - Lynxiene (Belgian Malinois) | Keno & Missy (Alaskan Klee Kai)
    Post edited by Unknown User at -0001-11-30 00:00:00
  • timtim
    Posts: 37
    In our experience with Akitas, "woolies" do indeed have a better overall temperament, especially in relation to people (they are just loveable, friendly and good natured). In terms of dog aggression, our wooly is still a pain with small dogs (they are all snacks, it appears), but in terms of anything remotely "Akita-like" in terms of aloofness, wariness, and "dignified" (have to laugh at that term for our dog), she's a push-over of stunning proportions. We bought an Akita based on everything we'd learned about the breed.

    We instead have a stunningly attractive Lab who loves everybody, licks, kisses, jumps, waves, and even at 3 yrs still occasionally pees with excitement when strangers come over.

    And it's NOT us doing some miraculous socializing - we've owned Chow Chows, and also have a Kai - these dogs have all been exactly (or darn near) as expected for their breed type.

    In fact, I feel our Kai is more aloof with strangers than I'd expect (or like), yet her little sister is unconditionally... a total spaz.
  • Interesting! I'd heard they had a different temperament, but wondered why that was. (And damn this is an old thread--I really knew nothing way back then! :lol:)
    Lisa, Toby (Shiba), Oskar and Zora (American Akita), and Leo (Kai Ken)
  • timtim
    Posts: 37
    Here's some photos of the Ushi (Japanese for "cow" because she reminds us of a Holstein):

    image
    image

    In serious need of a brushing!:
    image
  • PoetikDragonPoetikDragon
    Posts: 2875
    I find it very hard to believe that long coat is tied to temperament. It is much easier to believe that Ushi would be just as loveable even if her coat was short. Personality is extremely complex, and narrowing it down to one gene is an inaccurate model. While it is possible as an earlier post claimed, that the long coat gene is transferred along with other genes that make soft temperament, it doesn't in any way account for heterozygous individuals who have and pass on only one long coat gene (carriers). If the long coat gene were passed along with soft temperament genes, the carriers would also have soft temperaments by virtue of having received the gene.
    「怪獣荘秋田犬」Kaiju Kennels Japanese Akita and Hokkaido, Claire Matthews
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  • jellyfishjellyfish
    Posts: 1081
    It isn't unheard of to have coat colors associated with another "unrelated" trait.

    Cats with three colors in their coat are females. And something about white cats with blue eyes are deaf.


    So. I don't think it is out of the realm of possibilities that akitas with long coats could be sweeter in temperament. But, i'm not a geneticist. I'm more concerned with avoiding the long coat.

    Basically, i think we could debate about this all day, but it would be near impossible to definitively say since, my limited knowledge, no one really knows all the exact genes (and all that incurs with genes). I mean, we don't know how to control bridling genetically. So. I kinda think there is no *real* way to scientifically say one way or another. At least not by way of internet knowledge, lol
    Post edited by jellyfish at 2013-04-09 17:06:37
  • PoetikDragonPoetikDragon
    Posts: 2875
    @jellyfish: Any animal that lacks pigment in the retina will be blind and pigment on the eardrum will be deaf. Any animal with extreme white spotting could end up with white (unpigmented) areas of the retina or eardrum. Therefor, it is not unrelated, in fact, it is directly caused by being white. (As a side note, there are plenty of ways to get a white animal, extreme spotting is just one of them. So not all white animals will have this risk.)

    The red gene in cat is sex-linked. Males (XY) have one alelle (producing orange toms) while females (XX) have two alelles and can be heterozygous or homozygous (producing calico or tortishell queens).

    Linked genes are usually sex related. This is because the Y chromosome is actually shorter than the X chromosome; X can carry more alelles and genetic information than Y. These genes will only have one alelle in male individuals, preventing males from being heterozygous for a given trait; they are either clear or affected.

    For the long coat gene to be linked with other genes (not sex related), those genes would all need to be on the same chromosome and physically close to the long coat gene itself. During meiosis when the DNA is copied, the genes that are very close to each other are more likely to get copied together. It is entirely possible that some temperament related genes are next to the long coat gene within its chromosome.

    However, the fact still remains that if the long coat alelle is linked with other alelles, that linkage would be present and copy over during meiosis in all individuals who have a long coat gene -- not just the ones with the long coat appearance, but the carriers as well. At that point we're talking the majority of the Akita population. A great many Akitas would have soft temperaments because they are carriers, so many that you wouldn't be able to distinguish them from the rest.

    "No one really knows all the exact genes" actually, yes we do. There's even a DNA test for it.

    "So. I kinda think there is no *real* way to scientifically say one way or another." Of course there is. Scientific studies can be done even without identifying the specific genes. We know that VKH is genetic and highly heritable, for example, even though we don't have a test for it. Its simply a matter of having a proper study conducted, with scientific method, control groups, statistical analysis, etc. Not the limited experience and extremely biased opinion of pet owners who are looking to turn a conformation fault into a blessing.
    「怪獣荘秋田犬」Kaiju Kennels Japanese Akita and Hokkaido, Claire Matthews
    http://www.facebook.com/PoetikDragon
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    Post edited by PoetikDragon at 2013-04-09 17:24:15
  • aykayk
    Posts: 1979
    I wonder if long-haired pups get handled more before they are placed and thus account for the easier temperaments that are reported.

    I mean, who wouldn't want to cuddy up with such a fluff ball? Or touch the coat at least once?

  • PoetikDragonPoetikDragon
    Posts: 2875
    I think its the power of suggestion. People hear that long coats have soft temperaments, so when they get a long coat and it has a soft temperament, they attribute cause and effect when there is none. They then tell others the same thing and the myth passes on. If on the other hand they have a normal coat with a soft temperament or a long coat with a correct temperament, they think nothing of it.
    「怪獣荘秋田犬」Kaiju Kennels Japanese Akita and Hokkaido, Claire Matthews
    http://www.facebook.com/PoetikDragon
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  • timkimtimkim
    Posts: 377
    Coat length is nothing to do with temperament. i can find very aggressive long hair Akita very easy. it's the owner and it's nothing to do with it.
  • rikumomrikumom
    Posts: 438
    There's been studies that show correlation of temperament with coat colors in mammals, but I couldn't find any about coat length.

    As the owner of a midget long coat, it's actually annoying that complete strangers will manhandle my pup after asking my permission to "say hi". Just b/c she looks like a huggable teddy bear doesn't mean she wants to be treated like one. She especially doesn't like getting petted on the head/ears and will start mouthing the hand. I let her.
  • I don't think temperament is all environment (i.e. owner). While I haven't found that much hard evidence that temperament is inheritable, there seems to be plenty of anecdotal evidence that way, and I do believe it can be passed on. I believe there is a study we've got linked somewhere around here about fearful dogs passing that on to pups, at least.

    I'm not willing to say that coat length is or isn't tied to temperament. Some people think it is, some people think it isn't, but I don't think it's been proven either way.

    regardless, Ushi is super cute!

    And I don't think this is about pet owners who are trying to turn a conformation fault into a blessing. Where does that come from? I've heard the thing about long coats mostly from breeders who produced them and were placing them in pet homes. But no one was trying to justify producing long coats or anything like that--they were just talking about their experiences. Maybe those experiences are not based in hard science, but I'm certainly not willing to dismiss their experiences with dogs they know.
    Lisa, Toby (Shiba), Oskar and Zora (American Akita), and Leo (Kai Ken)
    Post edited by shibamistress at 2013-04-09 22:58:12
  • jellyfishjellyfish
    Posts: 1081
    I'm in agreeance with @shibamistress here, I don't think that it has been proven either way. Because of the uncertainty, no one can definitively say (with hard evidence) that temperment and long coats have any relation to each other. There could be very well no relation. thats fine. But don't think it has been proven either way.

    and i'll leave it at that.
    Post edited by jellyfish at 2013-04-10 02:38:35
  • aykayk
    Posts: 1979
    @shibamistress - With regards to pet owners who are trying to turn a conformation fault into a blessing, it's actually been brought up on one of the Akita FB pages. Some pet people in the UK want to petition the Kennel Club to accept long-hairs. They tie it to the Karafuto Ken and "natural" to the breed.
  • timtim
    Posts: 37
    Nature, nurture, some other factor (aliens?), I don't know - but I can say from *my* experience woolies are truly unique in disposition relative to their "non-defective" counterparts.
  • @shibamistress - With regards to pet owners who are trying to turn a conformation fault into a blessing, it's actually been brought up on one of the Akita FB pages. Some pet people in the UK want to petition the Kennel Club to accept long-hairs. They tie it to the Karafuto Ken and "natural" to the breed.


    Well, that's a totally different thing then. I'd not run across that, and of course, do not support it.

    Lisa, Toby (Shiba), Oskar and Zora (American Akita), and Leo (Kai Ken)
    Post edited by shibamistress at 2013-04-10 15:21:48
  • PoetikDragonPoetikDragon
    Posts: 2875
    Yeah, that was the attitude I was referring to -- not that anyone here was doing anything of the sort. Calling a spade a spade should not be taken as an insult. Nor should the owners of spades feel the need to trump up how awesome their spade is and why it is better than all other gardening tools. Yet LC owners all over the internet and Facebook get very defensive about their dogs' coat lengths, make wild claims about temperament, longevity, preservation, and so-on, and many also "put down" normal coated Akitas and their owners.

    Health concerns aside, there is nothing wrong with a long coat akita. They aren't inferior to the rest of the breed, just different. They can't be shown because it is against the breed standard which in turn is because the coat makes them less able to perform their traditional work -- but lets be honest, who can name any kennel that has working lines, Japanese or American Akitas? I don't think you can. I can't. So even then, the coat doesn't matter except for winning awards at shows. Nobody should be made to feel that their dog is "bad" or "defective" because of its coat. Every dog deserves to be loved, well cared for, and so-forth no matter how it looks, whether its purebred or not, and even if it has special needs. This is especially true for dogs that we humans intentionally bring into this world, the ones coming from breeders.
    「怪獣荘秋田犬」Kaiju Kennels Japanese Akita and Hokkaido, Claire Matthews
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    Post edited by PoetikDragon at 2013-04-10 14:37:39
  • rikumomrikumom
    Posts: 438
    .... Yet LC owners all over the internet and Facebook get very defensive about their dogs' coat lengths, make wild claims about temperament, longevity, preservation, and so-on, and many also "put down" normal coated Akitas and their owners...


    Well, we won't make any wild claims about temperament, longevity, etc, but I can see it's easy to develop a inferiority complex when one keeps getting questions like

    "what kind of mix is that?"
    "is that a chow mix?"
  • timtim
    Posts: 37

    Well, we won't make any wild claims about temperament, longevity, etc, but I can see it's easy to develop a inferiority complex when one keeps getting questions like

    "what kind of mix is that?"
    "is that a chow mix?"

    Well, given even without a long coat, I'd guess 90% of the world (or at least people in my neighborhood) couldn't identify an Akita on sight, I'd get other questions like "is it a wolf, is it husky, etc."

    People asking about the dog and attempting to associate it with something they "know" never upsets me at all... I look at it as my job as an ambassador for the breed to take time to explain what she is, how she's "defective" (a term of endearment, I assure you - since my Kai is also a "defect" being cream/white), and what a wonderful, albeit not for everyone, dog Akitas are. Ushi is awesome because she's so damn friendly - she wants to love and lick everybody, and most people are intimated by her size, if not her appearance, until they spend 30 seconds with her.

    We have friends who come over to see the dog more than to see us! If that's not a great boost for the breed, don't know what is!

    As an aside: with regard to "quality" of LCs, our breeder has told us that about 9 out of 10 longcoats the she breeds, are initially choosen as POTL - until the coat reveals itself. It's her opinion that structurally they are what she considers ideal dogs.

    She feels that the wooly dogs have better standard conformity, in general, other than the coat. Which obviously bums her out, but again, this could be relative to HER dogs. She breeds a few times a year and winds up with a handful of LCs, which she does NOT discount from "regular" dogs for pet homes - same price with/without the bonus fur.

  • rikumomrikumom
    Posts: 438
    It's very ironic that when I used to have only the shiba, people will ask me if he's an Akita or a Husky. That was before the shiba inu puppy cam and its 4 litters of cuteness.

    Now that we have both a shiba and a midget long coat JA, people mostly assume they're the same breed, she just has fancy ears.
    Post edited by rikumom at 2013-04-10 19:21:43
  • *JackBurton**JackBurton*
    Posts: 1369
    Well since we are all being honest here. The fact is people can spin this anyway they want it. Don't like a certain standard then go somewhere else and change it. Don't like a certain breeding practice then go do it anyway and lie about it.

    It kills me that people lecture on and on about the LC. From experience and not the science of big words I see the long costs having a different personality. They make fantastic pets for people but I stop there. They do not need to be purposely bred.
    www.akita-inu.com
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  • PoetikDragonPoetikDragon
    Posts: 2875
    I think the normal coats who have soft temperaments get overlooked. Long coats with soft temperament get noticed because of the power of suggestion; people are looking for them to have soft temperaments, and lo and behold, they do! Nevermind that most of the dogs the puppies in that litter are also soft, because that's what the breeder selects for in his lines, both parents are soft, etc.

    The fact remains that if the long coat alelle is linked to some temperament alelles, those alelles would also be present in the normal coated parents. After all, how could two carriers pass on that temperament genes to their offspring if they were not carriers of the temperament genes, too?
    「怪獣荘秋田犬」Kaiju Kennels Japanese Akita and Hokkaido, Claire Matthews
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    Post edited by PoetikDragon at 2013-04-10 23:04:05
  • bmass49bmass49
    Posts: 41
    My quesion is what does their coat need for maitnenance when its that long?
  • PoetikDragonPoetikDragon
    Posts: 2875
    The soft coat attracts every burr and thistle for miles around and requires regular attention. They do not blow their coat like a normal coated Akita and must be brushed constantly to aid removing the old hair. The fine hairs mat easily and prevent good airflow against the skin, which ruin's the dog's insulation against heat and cold. The hair also does not dry very quickly, and must thoroughly be blown dry whenever wet, otherwise water stays against the skin and cause skin irritations and infections. They lack the oils that keep the coat clean and dry and can get musty, dirty fur or have a noticeable smell. In cold climates, frost and icicles can build up in the fur, which causes the same problems as mats.
    「怪獣荘秋田犬」Kaiju Kennels Japanese Akita and Hokkaido, Claire Matthews
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    Post edited by PoetikDragon at 2013-04-12 18:50:13
  • Even my regular coated AA is pretty high maintenance in coat care. More so than my Shibas or Kai. His coat mats much more easily (especially at the elbows and in the "pants"), and the old hair doesn't come out as easily. His coat seems a little longer than normal to me, but I don't really think it is--I think it is just longer than the Shibas coat.
    Lisa, Toby (Shiba), Oskar and Zora (American Akita), and Leo (Kai Ken)
  • PoetikDragonPoetikDragon
    Posts: 2875
    Is he softer than your Shiba? How well does his fur stand out from the body, particularly in the problem areas? My AA has a much finer coat than my JAs, which makes it softer, lie flatter, and yes, be more prone to the same problems long coats have. Fortunately her coat is also pretty short (typical for an AA) so no real issues with mats. Mostly she gets hot spots if not thoroughly dried or if we don't help brush her during her shed.
    「怪獣荘秋田犬」Kaiju Kennels Japanese Akita and Hokkaido, Claire Matthews
    http://www.facebook.com/PoetikDragon
    http://www.facebook.com/KaijuKennels
    http://www.kaijukennels.com
    Post edited by PoetikDragon at 2013-04-12 19:31:54
  • Yes,his coat is softer and finer, and stands out from the body more. It's also just longer than the Shiba coats. He's lovely, and he LOVES cold weather (and doesn't do so well with heat in the summer), but I really do have to stay on top of coat care. Now that he's shedding, and I'm pulling clumps out of his "pants" area, I've found he actually had some pine needles in there that got matted up in there very close to the skin. Poor boy!
    Lisa, Toby (Shiba), Oskar and Zora (American Akita), and Leo (Kai Ken)
  • rikumomrikumom
    Posts: 438
    Meichan's puppy coat was as @PoeticDragon described, but she started to grow guard hair around 6 months of age. The guard hairs are about 3-4 inches long, but water proof & easy to care for like the shiba. But the rest of her that is either fuzz or feathering, is high maintenance and requires daily combing.
  • I just measured the long guard hairs on his neck--almost 3 inches long! I knew it was long and thick--when I'm petting him, I'm often surprised how long his hair is in the "ruff" area. Since he's having his first really major coat blow, most of his hair is much shorter now--he lost all his undercoat and the really long hair, but this winter it was super long and thick!
    Lisa, Toby (Shiba), Oskar and Zora (American Akita), and Leo (Kai Ken)
  • timtim
    Posts: 37
    In terms of coat management... think of it like a Chow Chow. In a perfect world they'd get daily brushing, monthly baths (or more depending on your environment) and you'd own stock in Swiffer & Hoover.

    You could knit sweaters for all of Texas with what comes off of here. I don't find her to be lacking in the typical oils, however, as somebody above said - it's there, but there's just a lot more fur to cover. Matting is an issue (behind ears, underarms, and wings on the hind and forelegs) if she gets wet and isn't brushed/blown dry.

    All the issues of a Chow Chow, but not nearly as difficult to work with to keep clean (and they aren't really smelly - only if they get into stinky stuff. No more smelly than a regular coated dog, IMHO). At least with my Akita, she can go to a groomer and get washed/brushed, etc. - my Chows would not every allow a non-family member to be that intimate with them.
  • lwrothlwroth
    Posts: 161
    Poetic Dragon wrote: "The fine hairs mat easily and prevent good airflow against the skin, which ruin's the dog's insulation against heat and cold. The hair also does not dry very quickly, and must thoroughly be blown dry whenever wet, otherwise water stays against the skin and cause skin irritations and infections. They lack the oils that keep the coat clean and dry and can get musty, dirty fur or have a noticeable smell. In cold climates, frost and icicles can build up in the fur, which causes the same problems as mats."

    I've had 3 longcoats--moderate longcoats, not the profusely coated ones--and none seemed to lack oils--they didn't get musty or dirty or have a noticeable smell, but they were basically house dogs. The first one I had lived outdoors in northern Alberta winters for about 5 years. She coped with the extreme cold in winter by developing the same kind of waxy coating that many LGDs develop. When I got her, it took 5 baths to get this chalky, waxy coating out of her hair. She was healthy after her outdoor years and had no skin problems.

    I really like longcoats and wouldn't like to see them bred on purpose but think it would be a shame if every breeder used the longcoat gene test so there were no more longcoats. There are many more important considerations for a breeding than coat length.

    BJ Andrews's book The World of the Akita (1996) had some discussion of longcoats and of the Karafuto dog. She was selling it at an ACA National when it first came out, and a very large longcoat of her breeding was often nearby. I'd seen her with one of her Foo dogs (basically a smooth Chow/Norwegian Elkhound cross in the beginning) at an Akita National and the notion came to me that perhaps she hoped to promote longcoats as the descendants of the rare Karafuto dog.
  • timkimtimkim
    Posts: 377
    long coat is like white boxer.
    it's not rare at all. it is part of breed but not standard.
    long coat is also akita. it's just not within the standard. they can make good pet for some ppl.
    Still i don't think personality comes from coat length.
  • "Heavier bone" is another trait of long coats. We know that Mongolians brought horses, Tibetan Mastiff and Chows to the Akita region from the 9th century.. Heavy bone and longcoat may come from the TM. Akitas also sometimes have purple spots on their tounges, like TMs
    Hopefully, DNA may one day tell us the truth.
    Post edited by Akitajin at 2017-09-02 22:55:35

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