Breed Bans
  • EvanEvan
    Posts: 121


    What are your views on such laws? As Pitbull mix owner you can probably guess my opinion. But what about Half-Wolf or Coydogs?



     This is what I feel like saying to every lawmaker thinking about imposing a breed ban...



     



     



     



     



     

  • brandon_wbrandon_w
    Posts: 3427


    "Punish the deed, not the breed."



    Breed bans are just absurd.  Punishing animals because of what humans have done to them just doesn't make any sense to me.  Dogs are not born vicious, they are made vicious.  Although I am surely preaching to the choir here.

    Post edited by Unknown User at -0001-11-30 00:00:00

  • Wolf and Coyote mixes are tricky. regrettably the people I have met who were parents of these animals were in no way qualified to be guardians of a wild dog. Banning them is not the answer (as proven by the ineffectiveness of breed bans). But I still wish that people had to pass a test before they could be responsible for the well being of an animal.



     



    Ugh. it is all too complicated. 

    Fuzzy Gang Signature
    Post edited by Unknown User at -0001-11-30 00:00:00
  • I cant get started or I will never stop.  They will start with the "viscous" breeds and once there is no more attention on them they will focus on other breeds.  Labs and retrievers will be next and "non-aggressive" dog owners need to realize that.  Ok...thx evan!  Good thing I am back on my psycho pills!
    Post edited by Unknown User at -0001-11-30 00:00:00
  • EvanEvan
    Posts: 121
    I read somewhere that Pitbulls passed the AKC Good Citizen Test more often than Cocker Spaniels and most other breeds fro that matter.
    Post edited by Evan at 2007-12-17 22:47:48
  • Yeah, there are a lot of other dogs above pits.  Pits just tend to cause more harm that other dogs which is why there is such a bad rap.  Damn evil yippy dogs (although I think shiba can be a bit yippy at times LOL).  And that was a joke....Wink
    Post edited by Unknown User at -0001-11-30 00:00:00

  • Pits have been bred for hundreds of years to be dog aggressive. And they are. Mine is wonderful with most dogs, but if she thinks that a dog poses a threat to me or Moto she is very protective.



    That being said, if I had to leave a child unattended ( which I NEVER would, but hypothetically speaking) with either my pit bull or my shiba inu, there is no question I would trust my pit bull to protect the child and slather her in kisses. Moto would nip if he was annoyed or thought the child wasn't paying him enough attention. 

    Fuzzy Gang Signature
    Post edited by Unknown User at -0001-11-30 00:00:00
  • ANGIEANGIE
    Posts: 4
    I am venomously against breed bans because it is a slippery slope and even if we did ban certain breeds new "BIGGER" "BADDER" ones would appear. We can take away the "weapon" but we can not take away the will to want it and therefore create another. I am not saying that Pits are weapons but in the wrong hands they can be. I have an American Bulldog which falls under that Pit Bull umbrella and I agree with the above post if I had to choose one of my 3dogs to leave with children it would be my AB. She is an over sized cuddle bug and Momma's baby girl. However she is an extremely powerful girl and in the wrong hands she could do a lot of damage. I wish that there some fair way that potential owners could be screened or regulated that would be ideal.
    Post edited by Unknown User at -0001-11-30 00:00:00
  • EvanEvan
    Posts: 121
    My Great Uncle adopted a border collie from a rescue, but before they okay-ed it, they came to his house checked things out, made sure he was able to take care of a dog like that's and if he ever decided he can't or if he died :Gasps: then the dog must go back to the rescue and they will find another appropriate owner. I think that's a good system, but I don't think a law should be passed to force that sort of thing.
    Post edited by Unknown User at -0001-11-30 00:00:00
  • I agree with leaving my rott/pit with children.  My friend was here with her 6 month baby and every time he cried sasha who is terrified of everything would conquer her fear and come up and lick him.  Again, disclaimer, would NEVER leave kids alone with them.  Niko has no bad will but she is mouthy and doesnt bite but kids hands tend to be drawn to her mouth.
    Post edited by Unknown User at -0001-11-30 00:00:00
  • kaikenonekaikenone
    Posts: 187
    Breed bans don't work. They do not fix the problem.

    The problem is the owners, either deliberate or ignorance, but regardless it is the owners responsibility not the whole breed. Stricter leash laws and stiffer penalties and more education is needed. I realize you will not get through with education to those people who think it is prestigous to own a viscious dog or the ones who think you have to make them mean in order for them to protect. That is where hard fines come in.

    Education needs to start at an early age in canine education programs for kids like they are starting in some schools. One of the Micheal Vick dogs Jonny Justice does this for a living now.



    Banning a specific breed will not stop the owners who have these viscous dogs. They will think it even cooler to own one and will obtain one regardless of the laws. If they decide not to own the particular banned breed, they will go out and acquire another breed that has just as much if not more to be a viscious dog for instance a Fila or Presa, etc..

    When legislators realize the "pit bull" BSL did not work they will methodically go down the list until all breeds are banned and we no longer have canine companions.

    According to a study in the UK after the introduction of the Dangerous Dog Act, the dog bites from Alsations (German Shepards), which had the highest percentage of dog bites before the law, had decreased but the bites by mongrels (mixed breeds) increased. It also stated that 50 percent of the dog bites/attacks were inflicted by dogs they knew.

    Something to think about on stricter leash laws, some cities may also be at fault here with their ordinances concerning fencing making it harder for an owner to contain their pets.

    I would have to think about the whole wolf/coyote mix aspect...
    Marsha Short
    Mijikai Kennel
    http://kaikenpuppys.tripod.com
  • In my apartment building, the ban certain breeds. Here is the clause about it in my lease contract.

    "Permission is not given to harbor a dog of the Rottweiler, American Pitt-bull, Pitt-
    bull Terrier, Pitt-bull, German Shepard and Doberman Pincher variety mixed or pedigreed, or any breed with an
    aggressive nature. Additionally a dog, a cat or animal of any kind or variety which at full maturity will weigh in excess of
    (40) pounds is also prohibited."

    Although I do not agree with banning breeds altogether, I think people do this as a precautionary measure. They would rather have a cute yorkie in the building compared to a huge rottweiler.
  • souggysouggy
    Posts: 247
    "The problem is the owners, either deliberate or ignorance, but regardless it is the owners responsibility not the whole breed. Stricter leash laws and stiffer penalties and more education is needed. I realize you will not get through with education to those people who think it is prestigous to own a viscious dog or the ones who think you have to make them mean in order for them to protect. That is where hard fines come in. "

    Research in France has illustrated strict leash laws actually worsen behavioural issues. The problem isn't really the leash law or free-roaming dogs, but rather socialization. A lot of people think a weekend drop-off at a dog-park or sticking them in a backyard is good enough for the dogs. In fact, urbanites who live in apartments tend to have better-socialized dogs since the owners are more likely to take their dogs with them on errand runs, to work and so on.
    Blog: Prick-Eared - now featuring primitive dogs
    Post edited by souggy at 2011-08-03 16:22:08
  • HeidiHeidi
    Posts: 3379
    I agree with that ^ People usually think that out in the country is the ideal place for a dog to live, but when I lived in the country, it was a real hassle to get my dogs in town for socialization or training. Now that I'm in the city, and have a teeny-tiny yard, they see a lot more people and dogs. Walking your unique and beautiful dogs around the neighbourhood is also a good way to get to know the neighbours. :o)
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  • BradA1878BradA1878
    Posts: 12221
    So true, when we lived in ATL we didn't have to work so hard to socialize our dogs - we always had people over, or were out with them.

    Now that we live in such a remote location, we have to may a constant conscience effort to socialize our dogs. It's ton of work now, where before it was not work at all, it was just "going out with the dogs".

    Even with that effort, we've noticed a few of or dogs have become less social due to the setting - Ahi for example, she has always been our "go anywhere" dog, but now she kinda freaks out when we get her inside a pet store or something - I guess she is used to the open space we have here.

    ----
  • souggysouggy
    Posts: 247
    Well, it depends on where out in the country you are. I would say Western Canada is a pretty crappy place to have socialized countryside dogs because people frown upon dogs that are on their property-- so most of the dogs out there have never been off of the owners' property. Whereas... certain places out East, it's actually culturally acceptable to have strange dogs over at people's place and for them to visit you-- so dogs are better socialized because they are "community dogs."

    I had a Cocker Spaniel that was a community dog in southern Alberta 15 years ago. He would visit everyone's houses by himself and get treats from the neighbours and such; he never got into a scrap with anyone's dog or cat. Everyone adored him. Nowadays, you won't find any dogs like that because the social norms has changed and "rural dogs" are expected to stay on the property-- or they are shot. These dogs are not as well socialized as they used to be two decades ago.
    Blog: Prick-Eared - now featuring primitive dogs
    Post edited by souggy at 2011-08-03 17:32:22

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