Japanese Wolf
  • ShikokuSpiritShikokuSpirit
    Posts: 2228


     There are two kinds




    On the Extinction of the Japanese Wolf

    http://www.wolfsongalaska.org/Wolves_Japan_on_extct.htm



    Is the Shamanu (canis lupus hodophilax) really extinct?

    http://www.newanimal.org/japwolf.htm



    Honshu Wolf Survival?

    Short Article and PHOTOS!!!

    http://www.cryptomundo.com/cryptozoo-news/honshuwolf/



    Photos of the Canis lupus hattai / hodophilax



    http://www.artensterben.de/details.php?id=22



    http://www.tbs.co.jp/seibutsu/zetsumetsu/ookami03-2.html



     http://www.sizenken.biodic.go.jp/rdb/txt/content/001.html



    http://img158.imageshack.us/img158/257/lobodehonshu3ni.jpg



    The Japanese Wolves are considered to be a sub-species of the Gray Wolf (canis lupus). Perhaps to understand them, you need to understand Gray Wolves.



    http://www.dnr.state.wi.us/org/land/er/factsheets/mammals/Wolf.htm





    I do see a lot of resemblance between the Shikoku and their wild canine couterparts. Namely the Wolf and Coyote. However, it is more so their pelts color then anything. As well as certain behaviors. Feature similarities of the Shikoku are pending with the wolves in different regions, even the wolves of the same species can and do vary upon their location.



    One thing is for sure, Shikoku are definitely a domesticated canine who have perhaps retained more of their ancient qualities as a result of selective breeding. So it would be incorrect to label them as a "Wolfdog". So many generations have already past.

    Areyarisu Shikoku Kenimage

    Kotomi | Maika | Zoey | Asra | Ranala

    Other Canine Members of The Airreyalis Crew: Zander (Alaskan Klee Kai) | Saphira (Belgian Groenendael) | Izanaiya, Sanosuke & Okiana (Yakutian Laika)
  • ShikokuSpiritShikokuSpirit
    Posts: 2228


    Though I do understand the common reference of the Japanese Wolf being a base during the early generations of our breed. Looking at the "Japanischer Wolf" drawing & photo (the first link under Photos section) it is easy to see why.



    I would not be surprised at all if our Shikoku ken are its descendants. I do believe that they would be cross-breds. However, what a fascinating story it would be to tell...to find that the Shikoku are actually its domestication.



    -grins- After all...domesticated dogs of today had to start somewhere. They didn't just *poof* and came about living with humans. Believing in the evolution process and natural selection, as well as selective breeding (uses humans had for them <-- for those canines that lived amongst them). Our canine companions took many years to develop.

    Areyarisu Shikoku Kenimage

    Kotomi | Maika | Zoey | Asra | Ranala

    Other Canine Members of The Airreyalis Crew: Zander (Alaskan Klee Kai) | Saphira (Belgian Groenendael) | Izanaiya, Sanosuke & Okiana (Yakutian Laika)
    Post edited by Unknown User at -0001-11-30 00:00:00
  • Michelle MMichelle M
    Posts: 593


    I have very little doubt that the Shikoku developed from one or more of these small wolves over a vast period of time. Just from looking at the pics, and from owning one (who is VERY primitive and naive in certain situations), I'm a believer.



    Since all dogs came from wolves, it stands to reason that the Shikoku came from these small Japanese mountain-dwelling wolves. I mean, look at that face! I doubt that there are any other wolf mixes other than the ones you mentioned (it doesn't stand to reason there'd be common grey in there, but I suppose you never know).



    Now, the question is, how many years and breeding cycles did it take to get the Shikoku from either or both of these wolves, and from there, their offspring and so forth making them no longer wolf hybrids (f1-f5). A few hundred years at least - you think? 4? 5?

    Post edited by Michelle M at 2007-07-29 19:15:03
  • BradA1878BradA1878
    Posts: 12224


    The noses of the Japanese Wolves pictured in the links above remind me of the Jomon Shiba - they have a slower transition to the tip of the nose.



     



    Those links are interesting - thanx for sharing.



     


    Has anyone done any reading on the Red Wolf? They are interesting and vary rare. The Red Wolf is one of the main discoveries that has pushed scientists to start really considering hybrids as a fundamental part of evolution. There is an interesting article in Outside Magazine on it.
    Post edited by Unknown User at -0001-11-30 00:00:00
  • BradA1878BradA1878
    Posts: 12224
    So you think the Hokkaido is so much more wild and primitive because it's more closely related to the Japanese Wolf than a Kai or a Shikoku?

    BTW: This is a red wolf - they are beautiful animals:


     



    image

    Post edited by Unknown User at -0001-11-30 00:00:00